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Storage Solution

We have...several games. Enough that we have trouble keeping them all in one place. We've had some stacked in a corner here, under a bench there, on a bookshelf somewhere else. Recently, certain persons to whom I am married suggested that it'd be great to have some kind of rolling cart we could put our games on, which we could wheel out when we wanted to pull out a game and then put away when we were done. She thought it was something which we could build, and after looking at prices for library carts (we're looking at $300 for something with the kind of storage we need), build one it was.

The lumber was reasonably cheap, less than $70 for manufactured pine panels, plus a few bucks for some nice wheels (two with built-in brakes to keep it stable when needed). An hour of router work gave me some reasonably functional dado joints, and construction went pretty quickly. The only really time-consuming bit, as ever, was finishing, which is always "lightly sand, put on a quick coat of (whatever), come back tomorrow, repeat." But it does, as hoped for, hold several games.


Final dimensions are about four feet tall by two feet long by 16 inches wide with three shelves. It's wide enough that it can have different rows of games visible on either side. I also managed to fit in a couple of little drawers I bought from a craft store. They fit perfectly in their space, but I was just absurdly lucky there. Smaller games (Fluxx, Zombie Dice, Gloom, etc.) and loose accessories (spare dice, 3d printed trays for Quarriors games that won't fit in the boxes) go there.


The detail I'm most fond of, though, is how the screws holding the shelves in are hidden. I found a design for dice on Thingiverse, sliced some faces off, printed them, inked the pips, and superglued them on. Now that's a gaming cart.


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