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Painting Practice

As anybody who ever reads what I write here surely knows, there's a new edition of the classic automotive combat game Car Wars in the offing, with the Kickstarter beginning in about a week as of this writing. I have very fond memories of playing it back in high school, and I'm looking forward to getting my hands on the new, faster playing version coming out soon.

One notable feature of the new version is that it'll contain plastic minis rather than the old cardboard counters we used back in the 80s. That's awesome, but there's an issue. Minis want painting, and my painting sucks. So, then, to get in some practice, I printed out a bunch of cars and weapons I got off Thingiverse. And I also tweaked a watchtower, attached a few TV cameras, and modified it to be a dice tower. Fun!




Layers of red and blue metallic paint making an interesting purple.




Glamouflage!







Of course, what I'm getting out of this is that once the game comes out, I'll probably leave the minis unpainted so that I don't mess them up.

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