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Treasure Attributes

I was thinking about what Peter wrote about rolling up treasure hoards, and a fairly simple tweak came to mind about how to handle certain kinds of attributes in a more flexible fashion which would ultimately allow one to set conditions on the kinds of items one found in a hoard. For example, a monstrous sea turtle or giant squid would only have items which were resistant to water, while a fire-based monster wouldn't have stuff that would burn. But the key to making that work is less the coding and more tagging items with the appropriate attributes. So what, then, are those attributes?  I came up with a few:

  • Enchanted/mundane
  • Shiny
  • Iron (which makes an item susceptible to both rust and magnetism)
  • Organic/nonorganic
  • Waterproof
  • Heat-resistant
  • Sanctity/corruption

But certainly they aren't the only ones. What else should be on that list?

Comments

Hmm...I would want to flag food on/off, TL^ items on/off, spices on/off, gems on/off, stuff like that.
Unknown said…
It seems like some other potentially useful attributes would be damaged/whole/mixed (given the 'corroded' modifier I saw on one of the items), as well as decoration type checkboxes (inlays and spikes but no beading).

Another possibility is potentially some decoration themeing (emphasizing river/water decorations over desert decorations, for example). I know Dwarf Fortress has some a nice collection of tagged decorations

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